Black History Month

Black History Month

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Today starts the first day of Black History Month for 2015. We have to know our history or we will always repeat our past.

Tell us who is your most influential person……

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Mary McLeod Bethune

Mary McLeod Bethune

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By:Ms. K

Mary McLeod Bethune was born July 10, 1875, in Mayesville South Carolina.She graduated from the Scotia Seminary for Girls in 1893. Believing that education provided the key to racial advancement, Bethune founded the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute in 1904, which later became Bethune-Cookman College.Mary McLeod Bethune was an educator and activist, serving as president of the National Association of Colored Women and founding the National Council of Negro Women.

Read more about her:

http://www.biography.com/people/mary-mcleod-bethune-9211266

Dr.Mae Jemison

Dr. Mae Jemison

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By: Ms. K

Mae Jemison was born in Dectaur, Atlanta on October 17, 1956. A physician who volunteered with the Peace Corps and the first female African American astronaut, Mae was also the first black woman to go into space. After her 1992 expedition on the Endeavor shuttle, she left NASA and founded the Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence (which sponsors science camps for kids), as well as companies involved in scientific and technological research.

Read  more about her:

http://www.biography.com/people/mae-c-jemison-9542378

Happy Birthday Rosa Parks !!!

Rosa Parks

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By: Ms. K

Happy 100th Birthday Rosa Parks. She was born in Tuskegee, Alabama February 4, 1913.Rose Parks refused to give up her bus seat in 1955 and sparked a movement that led to the end of segregation. Her courageous act fueled the Civil Rights Movement and inspired Martin Luther King, Jr. to get involved. Along with MLK, Jr., she continues to inspire those who still fight for equality.

Read More about Rose Park:

http://www.biography.com/people/rosa-parks-9433715

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Dr.Maya Angelou

Dr. Maya Angelou

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By:Ms.K

Did you know:  Dr. Angelou is a celebrated poet, memoirist, novelist, educator, dramatist, producer, actress, historian, filmmaker, and civil rights activist.Maya was a nightclub singer and dancer who toured Europe. She settled in New York and became part of the burgeoning black writing scene in Harlem. After moving to Ghana to teach at the University of Ghana’s School of Music and Drama, she met Malcolm X and collaborated with him on bringing equality and unity to America. She returned to the U.S. and was involved with the Civil Rights Movement, working closely with Martin Luther King Jr. She continues to inspire others and promote change through her writing and public speaking.

I Know Why the Cage Bird Sing:

Read more at:

http://mayaangelou.com/bio/

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman

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By: Ms. K

Did you know? Harriet Tubman was born into slavery and found a means of escape with the help of her abolitionist neighbors. In 1849, she fled her slave life in Maryland and found respite in Philadelphia. There she formulated a plan to liberate the rest of her family by way of the Underground Railroad, a system that involved moving slaves from one safe house to another under rigid secrecy. She was able to free her family and numerous other slaves throughout the years, taking them as far as Canada and helping them find safe jobs. Later, she worked as a nurse during the Civil War and was a proponent of both women’s suffrage and the abolitionist movement

Sojourner Truth-“Ain’t I A Woman?

Sojourner Truth

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By: Ms. K

Did you know? Sojourner was born into slavery with the name Isabella Baumfree. She changed her name after escaping from her owner. After the state’s Emancipation Act was passed, she become a vehement and vocal supporter of abolition and women’s right. She traveled the country giving speeches, including her famous one entitled Ain’t I a Woman? that emphasized the strength of women and acknowledging that even though woman wanted rights it was not equal within the black women community. They needed equality between the sexes.

Ain’t I A Woman?
Delivered 1851
Women’s Convention, Akron, Ohio

Well, children, where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter. I think that ‘twixt the negroes of the South and the women at the North, all talking about rights, the white men will be in a fix pretty soon. But what’s all this here talking about?

That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain’t I a woman? Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain’t I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man – when I could get it – and bear the lash as well! And ain’t I a woman? I have borne thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother’s grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain’t I a woman?

Then they talk about this thing in the head; what’s this they call it? [member of audience whispers, “intellect”] That’s it, honey. What’s that got to do with women’s rights or negroes’ rights? If my cup won’t hold but a pint, and yours holds a quart, wouldn’t you be mean not to let me have my little half measure full?

Then that little man in black there, he says women can’t have as much rights as men, ’cause Christ wasn’t a woman! Where did your Christ come from? Where did your Christ come from? From God and a woman! Man had nothing to do with Him.

If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back , and get it right side up again! And now they is asking to do it, the men better let them.

Obliged to you for hearing me, and now old Sojourner ain’t got nothing more to say.

To learn more about Sojourner Truth: